Report: NHL Salary Cap could rise to $92 million by 2025-26

nhl salary cap gary bettman
Jul 7, 2022; Montreal, Quebec, CANADA; NHL commissioner Gary Bettman speaks during the first round of the 2022 NHL Draft at Bell Centre. Mandatory Credit: Eric Bolte-USA TODAY Sports

A new report regarding the NHL Salary Cap by Sportsnet’s Elliotte Friedman and Rory Boylen indicates a possible rise by almost $10 million over the course of the next few seasons.

According to multiple sources NHL teams have been given some guidance on where the cap could be going over the next few seasons.

Sportsnet

NHL Salary Cap projections:

  • $83.5 million in 2023-24
  • $87.5 million to $88 million in 2024-25
  • $92 million in 2025-26 (estimated)

NHL Salary Cap rose to $82.5 million for this season

nhl salary cap
May 27, 2019; Boston, MA, USA; NHL commissioner Gary Bettman speaks at a press conference before game one of the 2019 Stanley Cup Final between the Boston Bruins and the St. Louis Blues at TD Garden. Mandatory Credit: Winslow Townson-USA TODAY Sports

The NHL salary cap went up for the first time in three years getting a $1 million boost to $82.5 million for the 2022-23 season. General managers were informed of the increase Tuesday at the league’s GM meetings in Florida back in March.

The NHL had held firm to a cap of $81.5 million through the pandemic due to lost revenues. The cap was last increased by $2 million ahead of the 2019-20 season.

In June, Commissioner Gary Bettman reported record revenues of $5.2 billion.

“Our revenues this season will be a record-high and within two, possibly creeping into three years we are anticipating resuming the more regular increases that the people had been growing to expect from the salary cap,” Bettman revealed.

Bettman also noted that a $1 billion debt held by the players will be repaid to owners by the end of the 2024-25 season, allowing for a significant increase to the cap in 2025-26 which the projections account for.

The league took out a $1 billion loan in January 2021 to be split among the teams in the event of cash-flow problems caused by the pandemic.